Despite their contributions as caretakers and producers of food for the family, women rarely earn commensurate respect from their households or communities. As Trickle Up participants, they engage in an empowering process that increases their self-esteem, decisionmaking ability, and control over resources.

Most Recent Data

92

of households that engaged in group advocacy for community work or infrastructure improvements, up from just 1% before Trickle Up. (India)

98

of participants have an active role in household decision-making. (Guatemala)

94

of participants reported feeling hopeful and expected their lives would continue to improve. (India)

Additional Data

2014

70

of participants engaged in a collective action to access government benefits or improve their communities. (India)

43

of people with disabilities or their caretakers reported leaving the house more often than before to attend a meeting, go to market or work. (Guatemala)

60

of participants reported an increased ability to resolve their own problems. (Burkina Faso)

2013

80

of participants reported being able to make household financial decisions themselves or in consultation with their husband. (India)

74

of participants have increased their financial independence. Now, only 3% report having to always ask a family member before making purchases. (Guatemala)

85

of participant’s households reported having at least one member participate in local government meetings verses only 31% before Trickle Up. (India)

2012

93

of participants reported feeling hopeful and expected their lives would continue to improve. (India and West Africa)

92

of participants reported being confident enough to travel alone outside of their community. (Global)

100

increase in the number of women who reported they could sign their own name. (India)

Other Key Indicators

Building Livelihoods

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Saving and Accessing Credit

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Combating Hunger

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HELP WOMEN FIND THEIR VOICE AND BUILD COMMUNITIES FREE OF EXTREME POVERTY